• Board contributors include instructors with "800" GMAT scores.
  • 95% of posts have replies within 24 hours.
  • Join for discounts with 800score, VeritasPrep and ManhattanGMAT


FAQ  - Register  - Search - Login 

All times are UTC - 7 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: GMAT Algebra
PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2013 11:34 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Apr 13, 2010 8:48 am
Posts: 483
Is (x – 4)(x – 3)(x + 2)(x + 1) > 0 ?
(1) 3 > x
(2) x > -1

A. Statement (1) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (2) by itself is not.
B. Statement (2) BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (1) by itself is not.
C. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question, even though NEITHER statement BY ITSELF is sufficient.
D. Either statement BY ITSELF is sufficient to answer the question.
E. Statements (1) and (2) TAKEN TOGETHER are NOT sufficient to answer the question, meaning that further information would be needed to answer the question.

(C) The expression (x – 4)(x – 3)(x + 2)(x + 1) is composed of four factors. It will equal 0 if at least one of the factors is 0. It will be positive if all the four factors are positive, if all the four factors are negative, or if two of them are negative and the other two are positive. Otherwise the epxression will be negative.

Statement (1), 3 > x, implies that the factors (x – 4) and (x – 3) are negative. The signs of the other two factors, (x + 2) and (x + 1), are not defined. E.g. they both can be positive if x = 1. Or one of them can equal 0 if x = -1 or x = -2. Or (x + 2) can be positive and (x + 1) can be negative if x = -1.5, etc. Therefore the original expression can be positive, negative or 0 and we can NOT give a definite answer to the original question. Statement (1) by itself is NOT sufficient.

Statement (2), x > -1, implies that the factors (x + 2) and (x + 1) are positive. The signs of the other two factors, (x – 4) and (x – 3) , are not defined. E.g. they both can be positive if x = 5. Or one of them can equal 0 if x = 3 or x = 4. Or (x – 3) can be positive and (x – 4) can be negative if x = 3.5, etc. Therefore the original expression can be positive, negative or 0 and we can NOT give a definite answer to the original question. Statement (2) by itself is NOT sufficient.

If we use the both statements together, statement (1) implies that factors (x – 4) and (x – 3) are negative. Statement (2) implies that factors (x + 2) and (x + 1) are positive. Therefore the original expression must be positive (2 negative factors × 2 positive factors). The both statements taken together are sufficient to answer the question. The correct answer is C.

Alternative method:
You may solve the original inequality first and then compare the solution with the inequality (1), inequality (2) and a system of inequalities (1) and (2) using the number line.
----------

Between -1 & 3 the expression acquires negative as well as positive values.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: GMAT Algebra
PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2013 11:35 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2010 2:11 pm
Posts: 459
Quote:
Between -1 & 3 the expression acquires negative as well as positive values.
It's x that is between -1 and 3, not the range of values of the whole expression.

If x > -1 then (x + 2) and (x + 1) are positive.
If x < 3 then (x – 4) and (x – 3) are negative.
Therefore the product of all factors, (x – 4)(x – 3)(x + 2)(x + 1), is positive for all values of x between -1 and 3.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: GMAT Algebra
PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2013 11:36 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Apr 13, 2010 8:48 am
Posts: 483
1st won't work - check for x = 3.5 and 7 - they will give opposite signs.
2nd won't work - check for x = 1 and 5 - they will give opposite sings.

Combining the both won't work - check for x = 1 and -1.5 - they again give opposite signs.

Hence the answer is E.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: GMAT Algebra
PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2013 11:36 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2010 2:11 pm
Posts: 459
Quote:
1st won't work - check for x = 3.5 and 7 - they will give opposite signs.
The both values do not fit in statement (1) 3 > x.
Quote:
2nd won't work - check for x = 1 and 5 - they will give opposite sings.
x = 1 and 5 both give the same sign.
(1 – 4)(1 – 3)(1 + 2)(1 + 1) = (-3)(-2)(3)(2) = 36 > 0
(5 – 4)(5 – 3)(5 + 2)(5 + 1) = 1 × 2 × 7 × 5 = 70 > 0
Quote:
Combining the both won't work - check for x = 1 and -1.5 - they again give opposite signs.
The value -1.5 does not fit in statement (2) x > -1.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: GMAT Algebra
PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2013 11:37 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Apr 13, 2010 8:48 am
Posts: 483
OKk..how about this..
1st won't work - check for x=1 and -1.5 - they will give opp.signs and satisfies x<3
2nd won't work - check for x=3.5 and 5 - they will give opp.sings and satisfies x > -1

combining both won't work- check for x=1 and -1.5 - they again give opp.signs and satisfies -1<x<3

hence ans is E


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: GMAT Algebra
PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2013 11:38 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2010 2:11 pm
Posts: 459
Quote:
1st won't work - check for x = 1 and -1.5 - they will give opp.signs and satisfies x < 3
That is correct.

Quote:
2nd won't work - check for x = 3.5 and 5 - they will give opp.sings and satisfies x > -1
That is correct as well.

Quote:
combining both won't work- check for x = 1 and -1.5 - they again give opp.signs and satisfies -1 < x < 3
That is NOT correct, because -1.5 does NOT satisfy -1 < x < 3.
-1.5 < -1 < x < 3


Here is the proof of why -1 < x < 3 works:
If x > -1 then (x + 2) and (x + 1) are positive.
If x < 3 then (x – 4) and (x – 3) are negative.
Therefore the product of all factors, (x – 4)(x – 3)(x + 2)(x + 1), is negative × negative × positive × positive = positive for all values of x between -1 and 3.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: GMAT Algebra
PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2013 11:38 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Apr 13, 2010 8:48 am
Posts: 483
For x = -3/2 the answer is -ive while for x = 0 it will be +ive. Thus even if we use both A and B, the value for the expression is not certain.
For range -1 to -2 the expression is -ive
For range -2 to -3 the expression is +ive

Thus answer should be E


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: GMAT Algebra
PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2013 11:39 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2010 2:11 pm
Posts: 459
(1) 3 > x
(2) x > -1

The both statements combined result in -1 < x < 3.

Quote:
For x = -3/2 the answer is -ive …
x = -3/2 is less than -1 and thus is NOT within the range.

Quote:
For range -1 to -2 the expression is -ive
For range -2 to -3 the expression is +ive
The both ranges are NOT within the range -1 < x < 3 .


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: GMAT Algebra
PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2013 11:39 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Apr 13, 2010 8:48 am
Posts: 483
Can you explain the alternative method in a little more detail.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: GMAT Algebra
PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2013 11:41 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2010 2:11 pm
Posts: 459
questioner wrote:
Can you explain the alternative method in a little more detail.
We solve the inequality (x – 4)(x – 3)(x + 2)(x + 1) > 0 first.

Mark the points 4, 3, -2 and -1 on the number line:
Image

The number line is divided into 5 segments. In each segment each factor does not change its sign (positive or negative). So the whole expression in the left side is of the same sign as any value within that segment. Buy picking numbers -3, -1.5, 0, 3.5, and 5 you can see that the solution of the inequality is:
Image

x < -2 , -1 < x < 3 , x > 4

Now, when you solved the original inequality, compare the solution to each statement.
(1) 3 > x
As you can see, within this range there are values from the solution ( x < -2 , 1 < x < 3 ) as also values that are not in the solution ( -2 ≤ x ≤ -1 ). So we do not have a definite answer.

(2) x > -1
As you can see, within this range there are values from the solution ( -1 < x < 3 , x > 4 ) as also values that are not in the solution ( 3 ≤ x ≤ 4 ). So we do not have a definite answer.

(1) 3 > x AND (2) x > -1 yield 1 < x < 3 .
All the values within this range are from the solution. So we have the definite answer "If (1) and (2) are both true (given) then the original inequality holds true."
Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 7 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
Template made by DEVPPL -
phpBB SEO
 
GMAT(TM) and GMAT CAT (TM) are registered trademarks of the Graduate Management Admission Council(TM). The Graduate Management Admission Council(TM) does not endorse, nor is affiliated in any way with the owner or any content of this site.